How does the duration of twilight differ depending on latitude?

How does the duration of twilight differ depending on latitude?

Twilight can continue the full 24 hours at latitudes within 9 degrees of either pole, as long as the sun's angular elevation difference is less than 18 degrees. This happens for one day in latitudes close to 9 degrees from the Pole and can last for several weeks as one gets closer to the Pole. At the equator, daylight and darkness are equal.

At high northern latitudes, where the sun is low in the sky for most of the year, there is little variation in daytime and nighttime temperatures because the difference is small. At low southern latitudes, where the sun is high in the sky for most of the year, there is very hot daylight and very cold nighttime temperatures because the difference is large.

At middle northern latitudes, where the sun is high in the sky but not completely so, there is more diurnal variation in temperature. The difference between daytime and nighttime temperatures is about the same as at the poles, but it only lasts for a few hours around noon when the sun is directly over the center of the earth.

At middle southern latitudes, where the sun is low in the sky but not completely so, there is even more diurnal variation in temperature. The difference between daytime and nighttime temperatures can be twice as much as at the middle north latitudes.

These differences in length of twilight and variation in temperature between day and night lead to different consequences for organisms living at these different locations.

How long is twilight in the summer?

Extending from one day to the next Twilight can extend from sunset until sunrise for latitudes higher than 48 degrees North or South on days near the summer solstice, since the sun can not descend more than 18 degrees below the horizon, hence full darkness does not occur even at solar midnight. At lower latitudes and in the winter, twilight ends earlier.

In terms of hours, twilight is the period of time between sunset and sunrise during which night falls but there is no total darkness. The length of twilight varies with the season and location within a region. At mid-northern latitudes around the summer solstice, twilight lasts for about six hours starting around when it starts getting dark outside (around sunset). But at high northern latitudes over 80 degrees north or south, twilight only lasts for about an hour after sunset before night falls completely.

At mid-latitudes any where else, like in the middle of California, twilight lasts about five and a half hours starting around sunset. And at low southern latitudes such as in Argentina or Chile, twilight ends early around three hours after sunset.

These are average lengths of twilight, because not every day is exactly the same. If you live somewhere that gets a lot of sunlight, like near the equator, then twilight is short. If you live in a place that often experiences cloudy days, like near the poles, then twilight can be very long.

Where is twilight the longest?

Poles The shortest twilight (astronomical twilight), lasting 1 hour and 10 minutes, occurs in the Equator, where the sun rises and sets at right angles to the horizon all year. The longest twilight occurs near the poles, lasting roughly six weeks before and after the yearly sunrise and sunset. During a polar night, the sky is completely dark except for a faint glow from the moon and stars.

Why does the color of the day affect how long it takes for twilight to come? Color affects how much sunlight reaches the ground. In general, yellow colors reflect more light than blue or red colors, so if there is no other source of light during a daytime eclipse then more of its time will be in darkness. However, at higher elevations or in cloudy weather this may not be true; at these locations red eclipses can last longer than blue ones.

Does the location of the shadow play a role in how long it takes for twilight to come? Yes. During a total solar eclipse, only the center of the shadow falls on the Earth, while during a partial solar eclipse the path of totality passes through multiple regions within each country or territory across which different amounts of sunlight reach the ground.

For example, within the United States the path of totality passes through both Oregon and Idaho, areas with very different types of terrain and climates.

Is twilight longer in winter?

Summer twilight lasts longer than winter twilight, with the difference increasing as one moves farther from the equator. On the first day of summer (and frequently other surrounding days), north of around 54 degrees north (or south of approximately 54 degrees south), night falls sooner than 4 or 5 o'clock in the afternoon, while for those same locations in winter, night never falls before 6 o'clock at least once during each 24-hour period.

As one travels toward the equator, day length remains more or less constant throughout the year, so that twilight hours continue to increase in length. By the time you reach the tropics, night will have fallen by 10 o'clock every day of the year.

The exact opposite is true near the poles: night falls very early in the winter and stays up very late in the summer. But because of the way Earth's rotation works, there are only 12 distinct seasons, not 13 like at the poles. The polar regions experience four seasons, but they're called "the dark season," "the light season," etc., rather than summer and winter because there is no sun during these periods. During the dark season, there is the sun but it does not rise above the horizon; instead, it lies directly below it, producing darkness everywhere face-on to the pole except where a few faint stars can be seen between the constellations Ursa Major and Leo.

About Article Author

Mary Conlisk

Mary Conlisk is a healer, spiritual development practitioner, meditation teacher and yoga instructor. She has been working in these areas for over 20 years. Mary's teachings are about love, healing and empowerment. Her work includes the physical body as well as the emotional, mental and spiritual bodies.

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